What is a Good AMH Level to Get Pregnant?

by | Mar 18, 2023 | Pregnancy

What is AMH?

Anti-Müllerian Hormone (AMH) is a glycoprotein hormone that plays a crucial role in the development and function of the reproductive system. It is produced by the granulosa cells in ovarian follicles and helps regulate the growth and maturation of eggs within the ovaries. AMH is commonly used as a biomarker to assess a woman’s ovarian reserve, which refers to the number of viable eggs left in the ovaries. The hormone is present in females from birth and declines over time, with levels usually dropping significantly as a woman approaches menopause. Let’s discuss a good AMH level to get pregnant further.

What is an AMH test?

AMH Test

AMH Test

An AMH test is a blood test that measures the concentration of Anti-Müllerian Hormone in the bloodstream. It is a valuable diagnostic tool for evaluating a woman’s fertility and predicting her response to fertility treatments. Healthcare providers may recommend an AMH test for various reasons, such as:

  1. Assessing ovarian reserve and predicting the potential for conception
  2. Determining the most suitable fertility treatments
  3. Diagnosing polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)
  4. Predicting the onset of menopause
  5. Monitoring the effectiveness of ovarian suppression therapy in cancer patients

The test can be performed at any time during the menstrual cycle, as AMH levels remain relatively stable throughout.

What does an AMH Test Tell you?

An AMH test provides valuable insights into a woman’s reproductive health by revealing her ovarian reserve status. The results are typically interpreted as follows:

  • High AMH levels: A higher-than-normal AMH level may indicate a greater ovarian reserve, suggesting a better chance of conceiving naturally or with assisted reproductive technologies (ART) such as in vitro fertilization (IVF). However, extremely high AMH levels can also be a sign of PCOS, a hormonal disorder that may lead to fertility issues.
  • Normal AMH levels: A normal AMH level indicates an average ovarian reserve, suggesting an average chance of conceiving and responding to fertility treatments.
  • Low AMH levels: A lower-than-normal AMH level may suggest a diminished ovarian reserve, which can make it more difficult to conceive and could be a sign that menopause is approaching. In such cases, healthcare providers may recommend aggressive fertility treatments or consider alternative family-building options.

 

What AMH Test can’t Tell you?

While an AMH test provides useful information about a woman’s ovarian reserve, there are certain limitations to what it can reveal:

  1. Egg quality: The test measures the number of eggs but cannot determine their quality. Egg quality is an essential factor in the likelihood of conception and healthy pregnancy.
  2. Fertility potential: AMH levels are only one aspect of fertility. Other factors, such as tubal patency, uterine health, and a male partner’s sperm quality, also play a role in successful conception.
  3. The specific timing of menopause: Although AMH levels can provide a general indication of when a woman might enter menopause, the test cannot pinpoint the exact time this will occur.
  4. Guarantee of conception: A high AMH level does not guarantee successful conception, just as a low level does not rule out the possibility of getting pregnant. Fertility is influenced by various factors, and successful conception depends on the unique circumstances of each individual.

In conclusion, an AMH test is a valuable tool in assessing a woman’s ovarian reserve and fertility potential. However, it is essential to consider the test’s limitations and use the results in conjunction with other diagnostic tools and clinical evaluations for a comprehensive understanding of a woman’s reproductive health.

 

What are AMH levels and what do they mean for you?

AMH (Anti-Müllerian Hormone) levels refer to the concentration of this hormone in a woman’s bloodstream. AMH is produced by granulosa cells within ovarian follicles and serves as a marker for ovarian reserve, which represents the number of viable eggs remaining in the ovaries. The hormone levels can give valuable insights into a woman’s fertility potential and help predict the response to fertility treatments. Here’s what different AMH levels may mean for you:

  • High AMH levels: A higher-than-average AMH level typically indicates a larger ovarian reserve, suggesting a better chance of conceiving naturally or through assisted reproductive technologies like in vitro fertilization (IVF). However, extremely high AMH levels can also point to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a hormonal disorder that may cause fertility problems.
  • Normal AMH levels: A normal AMH level signifies an average ovarian reserve, implying an average likelihood of conceiving and responding favourably to fertility treatments.
  • Low AMH levels: A lower-than-average AMH level may indicate a diminished ovarian reserve, making it more challenging to conceive and possibly signalling that menopause is nearing. In such cases, healthcare providers might recommend aggressive fertility treatments or explore alternative family-building options.

It’s important to note that AMH levels are only one aspect of fertility, and other factors like egg quality, tubal patency, uterine health, and a male partner’s sperm quality can also impact conception success.

 

Why do I have low AMH?

Low AMH levels can result from various factors, some of which are outlined below:

  1. Age: The most common reason for low AMH levels is age. As a woman gets older, her ovarian reserve naturally declines, leading to decreased AMH levels. This decline accelerates as women approach menopause.
  2. Genetics: Some women may inherit a smaller ovarian reserve from their mothers, leading to lower AMH levels even at a younger age.
  3. Medical treatments: Certain treatments, such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy for cancer, can damage the ovaries and reduce the ovarian reserve, resulting in low AMH levels.
  4. Surgical interventions: Ovarian surgeries, like the removal of ovarian cysts or treatment for endometriosis, can sometimes affect the ovarian reserve and cause a decline in AMH levels.
  5. Autoimmune disorders: Certain autoimmune conditions, such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis, can negatively impact ovarian function and contribute to low AMH levels.
  6. Environmental factors: Exposure to environmental toxins or chemicals may have adverse effects on the ovarian reserve, leading to lower AMH levels.

It’s essential to consult with a healthcare professional if you’re concerned about low AMH levels or experiencing fertility issues. They can provide a comprehensive evaluation, taking into account all factors that may be affecting your fertility, and recommend appropriate interventions or treatments based on your unique circumstances.

 

What is a Good AMH Level to Get Pregnant?

Good AMH Level to Get Pregnant

Good AMH Level to Get Pregnant

A Good AMH level for getting pregnant is having AMH between 1.0-4.0 ng/ml, which indicates a healthy ovarian reserve, suggesting chances of conceiving naturally. It’s important to note that AMH levels are just one aspect of fertility, and other factors such as egg quality, tubal patency, uterine health, and a male partner’s sperm quality also play a role in the chances of conception.

AMH levels can vary widely among women, and what may be considered a “good” level for one individual may not be the same for another. Generally, higher AMH levels are associated with a larger ovarian reserve and better fertility potential. However, there is no specific AMH level that guarantees pregnancy, as fertility is influenced by numerous factors, some of which cannot be assessed through AMH testing alone.

Average AMH levels (in pmol/l) for Women by Age:

Here is a table with data to help explain the average Anti-Müllerian Hormone (AMH) levels (in pmol/l) for women by age:

Age Group Average AMH Levels (pmol/l)
20-24 25.0
25-29 20.0
30-34 15.7
35-39 9.7
40-44 4.2
45+ 1.6

 

AMH Levels Relation with Fertility:

AMH levels serve as an indicator of a woman’s ovarian reserve, which has a direct impact on her fertility. The relationship between AMH levels and fertility can be summarized as follows:

  1. Higher AMH levels: Generally, higher AMH suggest a larger ovarian reserve and a better chance of conceiving, either naturally or through fertility treatments such as in vitro fertilization (IVF). However, extremely high AMH levels might be a sign of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a hormonal disorder that can lead to fertility issues.
  2. Normal AMH levels: Women with normal AMH levels usually have an average ovarian reserve, indicating an average likelihood of conceiving and responding well to fertility treatments.
  3. Lower AMH levels: Lower AMH levels are often associated with a diminished ovarian reserve, which can make it more difficult to conceive and could signal that menopause is approaching. In such cases, healthcare providers may recommend more aggressive fertility treatments or consider alternative family-building options.

It’s essential to remember that while AMH levels can provide valuable insights into a woman’s fertility potential, they cannot determine egg quality, which is another critical factor in the likelihood of conception and healthy pregnancy. Furthermore, AMH levels are just one piece of the puzzle when it comes to fertility, and a comprehensive evaluation of a woman’s reproductive health should consider all relevant factors.

A “good” AMH level for getting pregnant is one that suggests a healthy ovarian reserve, but it’s crucial to view AMH levels as part of a broader fertility assessment rather than an isolated indicator. Consult with a healthcare professional for a thorough evaluation of your reproductive health and personalized guidance on your fertility journey.

Monthly Chance of Natural Pregnancy by Age:

Age Group Monthly Chance of Natural Pregnancy
20-24 25%
25-29 20%
30-34 15%
35-39 10%
40-44 5%
45+ 1%

 

How Do FSH and AMH Levels Affect Pregnancy?

FSH (follicle-stimulating hormone) and AMH (Anti-Müllerian hormone) are essential hormones that play vital roles in a woman’s reproductive system. Their levels can provide valuable information about a woman’s fertility potential, as well as her chances of successful conception and pregnancy.

FSH and Pregnancy:

FSH is produced by the pituitary gland and stimulates the growth and maturation of ovarian follicles, which contain eggs. An FSH test is typically performed on day 3 of the menstrual cycle and measures the level of FSH in the bloodstream. Higher FSH levels may indicate diminished ovarian reserve and lower fertility potential, as the body produces more FSH to stimulate the ovaries when the ovarian reserve is low.

Elevated FSH levels may make it more challenging to conceive, either naturally or through fertility treatments, as they can suggest a reduced number of quality eggs remaining in the ovaries.

AMH and Pregnancy:

As mentioned earlier, AMH is produced by granulosa cells within ovarian follicles and serves as a marker for ovarian reserve. Higher AMH levels typically indicate a larger ovarian reserve and better fertility potential, while lower levels suggest a diminished reserve and reduced fertility.

AMH levels can give valuable insights into a woman’s fertility potential and help predict the response to fertility treatments, such as in vitro fertilization (IVF). However, it’s important to remember that AMH levels cannot determine egg quality, which is another critical factor in the likelihood of conception and healthy pregnancy.

Also Read: How to Confirm Whether Sperm Went Inside

Low AMH Levels for Pregnancy/Fertility:

Low AMH levels are often associated with a diminished ovarian reserve, which can make it more difficult to conceive and could signal that menopause is approaching. Here are some key points to consider when dealing with low AMH levels:

  1. Fertility treatments: Women with low AMH levels may require more aggressive fertility treatments, such as higher doses of fertility medications or in vitro fertilization (IVF) with donor eggs, to increase their chances of conception.
  2. Time-sensitive: Since low AMH levels can indicate that a woman’s ovarian reserve is declining, it’s crucial to act promptly when considering fertility treatments or family-building options.
  3. Holistic fertility assessment: AMH levels are just one aspect of fertility, and it’s essential to consider other factors, such as egg quality, tubal patency, uterine health, and a male partner’s sperm quality when evaluating a woman’s fertility potential.
  4. Lifestyle factors: Adopting a healthy lifestyle, including a balanced diet, regular exercise, stress management, and avoiding harmful substances, can help support overall reproductive health and possibly improve fertility.

low AMH levels can pose challenges for fertility, but it’s important to remember that they are just one piece of the puzzle. A comprehensive evaluation of a woman’s reproductive health should consider all relevant factors.

 

Risk of Genetically Abnormal Pregnancy By Age:

Age Group Risk of Genetically Abnormal Pregnancy
20-24 years 1 in 500
25-29 years 1 in 475
30-34 years 1 in 350
35-39 years 1 in 200
40-44 years 1 in 100
45+ years 1 in 50

 

AMH Levels by Age:

Age Group Anti-Müllerian Hormone Levels (ng/mL)
20-24 years 4.0 – 6.8
25-29 years 3.6 – 5.5
30-34 years 2.8 – 4.2
35-39 years 1.6 – 2.6
40-44 years 0.5 – 1.4
45+ years < 0.5

 

Age Comparison with Natural Pregnancy & AMH Levels:

Age Group Monthly Chance of Natural Pregnancy Egg Count Over Time Number of Genetically Abnormal Embryos Risk of Genetically Abnormal Pregnancy AMH Levels (ng/mL) Chance of Pregnancy Using IVF and Donor Eggs
20-24 25% ~500,000 10% 2% 4.0 – 6.8 55%
25-29 20% ~400,000 20% 4% 3.6 – 5.5 50%
30-34 15% ~300,000 30% 7% 2.8 – 4.2 45%
35-39 10% ~200,000 50% 15% 1.6 – 2.6 35%
40-44 5% ~100,000 70% 30% 0.5 – 1.4 20%
45+ 1% ~50,000 90% 50%+ <0.5 5%

What is a Good AMH level for IVF?

Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) is a hormone produced by cells in a woman’s ovarian follicles, and it serves as an indicator of her ovarian reserve. A good AMH for IVF is one that suggests a woman has a sufficient ovarian reserve, which can increase the likelihood of success with IVF treatment.

AMH levels can vary significantly among women, and there is no universal “good” level for everyone. However, AMH levels typically range between 1.0 and 4.0 nanograms per millilitre (ng/mL) in women of reproductive age, with levels above 1.0 ng/mL generally considered favourable for IVF. It is important to note that AMH is just one factor among many that can impact the success of IVF, and having a good AMH for IVF does not guarantee successful IVF treatment.

When a woman has a high AMH level, it often indicates a higher number of available eggs in her ovarian reserve. This can be beneficial for IVF because it allows fertility specialists to retrieve more eggs during the egg retrieval process, increasing the chances of obtaining viable embryos for transfer.

Conversely, a low AMH may signify a diminished ovarian reserve, which can make IVF more challenging. Women with low AMH levels may produce fewer eggs during ovarian stimulation, resulting in a smaller pool of embryos to choose from for transfer. This can lead to lower success rates with IVF treatment. However, it is crucial to remember that each individual’s fertility journey is unique, and some women with low AMH levels may still achieve pregnancy through IVF.

Chance Of Pregnancy by IVF And Donor Eggs:

Age Group Chance of Pregnancy Using IVF and Donor Eggs
20-24 55%
25-29 50%
30-34 45%
35-39 35%
40-44 20%
45+ 5%

Egg Count Over Time by Age:

Age Group Egg Count Over Time
20-24 ~500,000
25-29 ~400,000
30-34 ~300,000
35-39 ~200,000
40-44 ~100,000
45+ ~50,000

 

What do low AMH levels mean for my chances of IVF?

Low AMH levels can indicate a diminished ovarian reserve, which may impact your chances of success with IVF. A diminished ovarian reserve means that there are fewer eggs available in the ovaries, which can lead to a lower number of eggs retrieved during the egg retrieval process. This can result in fewer embryos to choose from for transfer, potentially reducing the likelihood of a successful pregnancy.

However, it is essential to recognize that low AMH levels are not the sole determinant of IVF success. Other factors, such as egg quality, sperm quality, and the overall health of the individuals involved, can also influence the outcome of IVF treatment. Furthermore, advancements in fertility treatment methods and technologies have improved the chances of success for women with low AMH levels. For instance, some fertility clinics employ specialized protocols for ovarian stimulation tailored to women with diminished ovarian reserve, aiming to optimize egg quality rather than quantity.

While low AMH levels can present challenges in IVF, they do not necessarily preclude the possibility of achieving a successful pregnancy. Each woman’s fertility journey is unique, and the outcome of IVF treatment depends on a combination of factors. It is important to discuss your specific situation with your fertility specialist, as they can provide personalized guidance and recommendations based on your individual circumstances.

For some women with low AMH levels, using donor eggs may be a viable option to increase the chances of success with IVF. By utilizing donor eggs from a younger, healthier donor, the quality of the embryos created through IVF may be improved, potentially leading to higher pregnancy rates. This can be a valuable alternative for women whose own eggs may be less likely to result in a successful pregnancy due to diminished ovarian reserve or other factors affecting egg quality.

low AMH levels can indicate a diminished ovarian reserve, which may affect your chances of success with IVF. However, various factors can influence IVF outcomes, and advancements in fertility treatments offer hope to women with low AMH levels. It is important to work closely with your fertility specialist to determine the best course of action based on your individual situation and explore all available options, including the use of donor eggs if necessary.

 

Interpretation of AMH Test Results:

Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) is a hormone produced by the granulosa cells within the small, developing follicles in a woman’s ovaries. AMH serves as an indicator of a woman’s ovarian reserve, which refers to the number of eggs remaining in her ovaries. The AMH test is a blood test used to measure AMH levels and help assess a woman’s fertility potential.

Interpreting AMH test results can provide valuable information about a woman’s ovarian reserve and her chances of achieving pregnancy through natural means or assisted reproductive techniques, such as in vitro fertilization (IVF). However, it is crucial to understand that AMH levels are just one piece of the fertility puzzle, and other factors such as age, overall health, and lifestyle also play a significant role in determining fertility potential.

Also Read: Symptoms of Low AMH Level

What is a Normal AMH level?

A normal AMH level can vary widely among women, as it is influenced by factors like age, genetics, and environmental factors. Generally, AMH levels range between 1.0 and 4.0 nanograms per millilitre (ng/mL) for women of reproductive age. It is important to note that “normal” AMH levels can differ depending on the laboratory conducting the test and the specific reference ranges they use.

A normal AMH level typically suggests that a woman has an adequate ovarian reserve, which can increase her likelihood of conceiving naturally or through fertility treatments such as IVF. However, it is essential to remember that a normal AMH level does not guarantee pregnancy, as other factors like egg quality, sperm quality, and the overall health of the individuals involved can also impact fertility outcomes.

 

What is an Ideal AMH Level According to Age?

AMH levels naturally decline as a woman ages, so the ideal level will vary depending on her age. Below are some general guidelines for ideal AMH levels by age:

  • 20-24 years: 4.0 – 6.8 ng/mL
  • 25-29 years: 3.6 – 5.5 ng/mL
  • 30-34 years: 2.8 – 4.2 ng/mL
  • 35-39 years: 1.6 – 2.6 ng/mL
  • 40-44 years: 0.5 – 1.4 ng/mL

 

What is a low AMH Level Range?

A low AMH level is typically considered to be below 1.0 ng/ml. Low AMH levels can indicate a diminished ovarian reserve, which means that there are fewer eggs available in a woman’s ovaries. This can make it more challenging to conceive, both naturally and through fertility treatments like IVF.

It is important to understand that a low AMH does not necessarily mean that a woman is infertile, as other factors can influence her ability to conceive. However, women with low AMH levels may face more challenges in achieving pregnancy and may require additional support or specialized fertility treatments to optimize their chances of success.

In conclusion, AMH test results can provide valuable insights into a woman’s ovarian reserve and fertility potential. Normal and ideal AMH levels can vary depending on factors such as age and overall health, and it is important to consult with a healthcare professional to interpret your specific results and develop a personalized fertility plan. Low AMH levels can indicate a diminished ovarian reserve, which may impact a woman’s chances of conceiving, but it is essential to remember that many factors contribute to fertility outcomes, and each individual’s fertility journey is unique.

 

Treatment Options for Low AMH Levels:

When a woman has low AMH levels, it indicates a diminished ovarian reserve, which can make it more challenging to conceive. While it is not possible to reverse the natural decline in ovarian reserve, there are treatments for low AMH levels:

  1. Individualized Ovarian Stimulation Protocols: Fertility specialists can develop tailored ovarian stimulation protocols for women with low AMH levels. These protocols often focus on optimizing egg quality rather than quantity, using carefully selected medications and dosages to encourage the development of healthy, mature eggs.
  2. In Vitro Fertilization (IVF): IVF is a common fertility treatment that can be effective for women with low AMH levels. During IVF, eggs are retrieved from the ovaries, fertilized with sperm in a laboratory, and the resulting embryos are transferred back into the uterus. By closely monitoring and controlling the process, fertility specialists can maximize the chances of a successful pregnancy.
  3. Donor Eggs: For women with significantly diminished ovarian reserve, using donor eggs can be a viable option to increase the chances of success with IVF. Donor eggs from younger, healthier donors can improve the quality of the embryos created through IVF, potentially leading to higher pregnancy rates.
  4. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10): Some studies suggest that taking CoQ10, a natural antioxidant, may help improve egg quality in women with low AMH levels.
  5. Lifestyle Changes: Adopting a healthy lifestyle can help support overall fertility, even for women with low AMH levels. This includes maintaining a balanced diet, getting regular exercise, managing stress, and avoiding harmful substances such as tobacco and excessive alcohol.

How to Increase AMH Levels:

While it is not possible to significantly increase AMH levels or reverse the natural decline in ovarian reserve, there are some steps women can take to support their overall fertility and improve egg quality:

  1. Maintain a Healthy Lifestyle: Eating a balanced diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean proteins can support overall health and fertility. Regular exercise, stress management, and getting adequate sleep can also positively impact fertility.
  2. Take Supplements: Some supplements, such as Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and DHEA, have been suggested to help improve egg quality in women with low AMH levels.
  3. Avoid Environmental Toxins: Exposure to certain environmental toxins, such as cigarette smoke and chemicals found in some plastics, can negatively impact fertility. Taking steps to minimize exposure to these toxins can support overall fertility and egg quality.

 

How Can AMH Levels Improve Naturally?

While it is not possible to significantly increase AMH levels naturally or reverse the natural decline in ovarian reserve, adopting a healthy lifestyle and avoiding environmental toxins can help support overall fertility and improve egg quality. This includes maintaining a balanced diet, exercising regularly, managing stress, getting adequate sleep, and minimizing exposure to harmful substances.

 

Can AMH Levels Fluctuate?

Yes, AMH levels can fluctuate to some extent due to factors such as hormonal changes, certain medications, and variations in laboratory testing methods. However, these fluctuations are generally minor and do not significantly impact the overall interpretation of a woman’s ovarian reserve.

In conclusion, while low AMH levels can present challenges in achieving pregnancy, there are treatment options available to support women in their fertility journey. Adopting a healthy lifestyle, considering tailored fertility treatments, and exploring the use of donor eggs if necessary, can help maximize the chances of success for women with low AMH levels. It is essential to work

Also Read: AMH Test Price

F.A.Q:

Q: What is a good AMH level by age?

A: A good AMH level varies depending on a woman’s age, as AMH levels naturally decline with age. For instance, a good level for women in their 20s is typically between 4.0 – 6.8 ng/mL, while a good level for women in their 40s is between 0.5 – 1.4 ng/mL. It is important to remember that these ranges can vary between individuals.

Q: What is a good AMH for fertility?

A: A good AMH for fertility typically falls between 1.0 and 4.0 ng/mL for women of reproductive age. A higher level indicates a higher ovarian reserve, which can increase the chances of achieving pregnancy naturally or through fertility treatments.

Q: What is an ideal AMH level for IVF?

A: An ideal AMH level for IVF is one that suggests a sufficient ovarian reserve, which can increase the likelihood of success with IVF treatment. While there is no universal “ideal” level, having an AMH above 1.0 ng/mL is generally considered favourable for IVF.

Q: What is a good AMH for PCOS?

A: Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) often have higher AMH levels than women without the condition. A good AMH level for women with PCOS can vary depending on the individual, but it is generally within the same range as for women without PCOS. The primary focus for women with PCOS should be on managing the symptoms of the condition and optimizing overall fertility.

Q: How much AMH is PCOS?

A: AMH levels in women with PCOS can be two to three times higher than in women without the condition. However, the specific AMH associated with PCOS can vary greatly between individuals.

Q: What time of the month is AMH highest?

A: AMH levels remain relatively stable throughout the menstrual cycle, which means there is no specific time of the month when AMH levels are highest. This stability makes AMH testing convenient, as it can be done at any time during the cycle.

Q: How can I increase my AMH naturally?

A: While it is not possible to significantly increase AMH levels or reverse the natural decline in ovarian reserve, adopting a healthy lifestyle, taking certain supplements (such as CoQ10), and avoiding environmental toxins can help support overall fertility and improve egg quality.

Q: What is a bad AMH level?

A: A “bad” or low AMH level is typically considered to be below 1.0 ng/mL. Low AMH levels can indicate a diminished ovarian reserve, which may impact a woman’s chances of conceiving, both naturally and through fertility treatments like IVF.

Q: Does high AMH mean very fertile?

A: High AMH levels can be an indicator of a greater ovarian reserve, which can be associated with higher fertility potential. However, it is important to remember that fertility depends on many factors, including egg quality, sperm quality, and overall health.

Q: What is the average AMH for a 37-year-old?

A: The average AMH for a 37-year-old woman is generally between 1.6 and 2.6 ng/mL. However, individual levels can vary, and it is important to consult with a healthcare professional to assess your specific situation.

Q: Does high AMH mean good egg quality?

A: High AMH levels can indicate a higher ovarian reserve, which means more eggs are available in the ovaries. However, high AMH levels do not necessarily guarantee good egg quality, as egg quality is influenced by factors such as age, lifestyle, and overall health.

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    Dr Mona Dahiya

    Dr Mona Dahiya

    IVF Specialist & Consultant

    Dr Mona Dahiya has performed over 5,000+ IVF cycles and is considered a global expert in IVF, ICSI, IUI and male fertility treatment. She is an eminent writer on Infertility Treatment and has over 100 Publications in both International and National Journals. Dr Mona Dahiya has immensely contributed to the field of infertility through her Research and articles.

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