AMH Blood Test: Normal Range, Level & Price

by | Mar 29, 2023 | Fertility

What is AMH?

Anti-Mullerian Hormone (AMH) is a glycoprotein hormone produced by the granulosa cells in the ovarian follicles. It plays a crucial role in female fertility and reproductive health. AMH is responsible for regulating the development of primary ovarian follicles and serves as a reliable marker of ovarian reserve.

Ovarian reserve refers to the remaining number of eggs a woman has in her ovaries. As women age, their ovarian reserve gradually declines, impacting fertility. AMH is unique because its levels remain relatively stable throughout the menstrual cycle, making it a valuable tool in assessing a woman’s fertility.

 

What is the AMH Blood Test?

AMH Blood Test

AMH Blood Test

The AMH blood test is a blood test that measures the levels of Anti-Mullerian Hormone in a woman’s bloodstream. This test is often used by healthcare providers to evaluate a woman’s ovarian reserve and determine her fertility potential. The test can be performed at any time during the menstrual cycle, as AMH levels do not fluctuate significantly throughout the month.

Reasons for an AMH Blood Test:

The AMH test has a variety of applications in reproductive medicine, such as:

  1. Assessing ovarian reserve: The primary purpose of the AMH test is to evaluate a woman’s ovarian reserve and fertility potential.
  2. IVF treatment: In vitro fertilization (IVF) clinics often use the AMH test to predict a woman’s response to ovarian stimulation medications, which helps tailor treatment protocols.
  3. Diagnosing polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS): Women with PCOS tend to have higher levels of AMH, so the test can help support the diagnosis of this common reproductive disorder.
  4. Premature ovarian insufficiency: The AMH test can also help identify women at risk for premature ovarian insufficiency, a condition where the ovaries lose function before the age of 40.
  5. Evaluating the need for fertility preservation: Women who plan to delay childbearing or undergo medical treatments that may impact fertility can use the AMH test to determine if fertility preservation options should be considered.

 

What Does the AMH Blood Test Mean?

Interpreting AMH Blood Test Levels:

AMH levels vary among women and can be categorized into three groups:

  1. Low AMH: Low levels of AMH may indicate diminished ovarian reserve and decreased fertility potential. However, it does not necessarily mean that pregnancy is impossible.
  2. Normal AMH: A normal AMH level indicates average fertility potential and ovarian reserve.
  3. High AMH: Elevated levels of AMH can be a sign of PCOS or a higher-than-average ovarian reserve. In some cases, high AMH levels can be associated with decreased fertility due to the underlying hormonal imbalance in PCOS.

Limitations of the AMH Blood Test:

It is essential to understand that while the AMH test provides valuable information about a woman’s fertility potential, it is not a definitive predictor of her ability to conceive. Factors such as age, overall health, and the quality of the eggs also play significant roles in fertility.

Additionally, the AMH test is not a standalone diagnostic tool. Healthcare providers often use it in conjunction with other tests and clinical evaluations to create a comprehensive picture of a woman’s reproductive health.

 

Why is the AMH Blood Test Done?

The AMH test is a blood test that measures the levels of Anti-Mullerian Hormone in a woman’s bloodstream. This hormone serves as a reliable indicator of ovarian reserve and fertility potential. Here are some of the key reasons why the AMH test is performed:

  1. Assessing Ovarian Reserve and Fertility Potential: AMH levels provide valuable information about a woman’s remaining egg supply, also known as the ovarian reserve. As women age, their ovarian reserve declines, impacting fertility. Healthcare providers use the AMH test to evaluate a woman’s fertility potential and develop personalized fertility plans.
  1. In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) Treatment: IVF clinics often use the AMH test to predict a woman’s response to ovarian stimulation medications. This information helps them customize treatment protocols to optimize the chances of a successful pregnancy.
  1. Diagnosing Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS): Women with PCOS typically have higher levels of AMH than their counterparts without the condition. The AMH test can support the diagnosis of this common hormonal disorder that affects approximately 1 in 10 women of reproductive age.
  1. Identifying Premature Ovarian Insufficiency: Premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) is a condition where the ovaries lose function before the age of 40. The AMH test can help identify women at risk for POI, allowing for early intervention and fertility preservation.
  1. Fertility Preservation: Women who plan to delay childbearing or undergo medical treatments that may impact fertility can use the AMH test to determine if fertility preservation options, such as egg freezing, should be considered.

 

Why Do I Need an AMH Blood Test?

While not every woman needs an AMH test, it may be beneficial if you:

  • Are considering family planning and want to assess your fertility potential?
  • Are undergoing IVF treatment or planning to start IVF?
  • Suspect you may have PCOS or other hormonal imbalances.
  • Have a family history of early menopause or POI.
  • Plan to delay childbearing or undergo medical treatments that may compromise fertility.

 

When to Do the AMH Blood Test?

The AMH test can be performed at any time during the menstrual cycle, as AMH levels do not fluctuate significantly throughout the month. However, it’s important to consult your healthcare provider to determine the best time for testing based on your individual needs and medical history.

Factors to Consider:

While the AMH test can be performed at any point in the menstrual cycle, certain factors may affect its accuracy:

  • Age: AMH levels naturally decline with age. It is essential to interpret test results within the context of a woman’s age.
  • Hormonal contraceptives: Some hormonal contraceptives may suppress AMH levels, leading to inaccurately low results. Consult your healthcare provider if you’re using hormonal birth control.
  • Pregnancy: AMH levels may be lower during pregnancy, so it’s best to wait until after delivery to undergo testing.

The AMH test is a valuable tool for assessing a woman’s ovarian reserve and fertility potential. While it’s not a definitive predictor of fertility, it can help guide family planning decisions and inform medical treatments

 

Preparation for the AMH Blood Test:

The AMH test does not require any specific preparations, as it can be performed at any time during your menstrual cycle. However, it’s essential to inform your healthcare provider about any medications or hormonal contraceptives you may be taking, as they could potentially impact the test results.

Low AMH levels can be concerning, particularly for women who are trying to conceive or planning for future pregnancies. While low AMH levels are not always accompanied by noticeable symptoms, they can be associated with underlying conditions that impact fertility, such as premature ovarian insufficiency or early menopause.

Understanding the causes and potential symptoms of low AMH levels, as well as the AMH test procedure, can help you make informed decisions about your reproductive health. Consult your healthcare provider if you have concerns about your fertility or if you’re considering undergoing the AMH test. They can provide guidance and support tailored to your unique needs and circumstances.

 

Interpretation of AMH Blood Test Results:

Interpreting AMH test results involves understanding the relationship between AMH levels and ovarian reserve. The test measures the amount of Anti-Mullerian Hormone present in the blood, which serves as an indicator of a woman’s remaining egg supply. AMH levels can provide valuable insights into a woman’s fertility potential and help guide family planning decisions or fertility treatments.

It’s important to remember that while the AMH test is a useful tool for assessing ovarian reserve, it is not a definitive predictor of fertility. Factors such as age, overall health, and egg quality also play significant roles in a woman’s ability to conceive.

 

What is the AMH Test Normal Range?

The normal range for AMH levels can vary depending on the laboratory conducting the test and the specific measurement units used. In general, AMH levels are measured in nanograms per millilitre (ng/mL) or picomoles per litre (pmol/L). The following ranges are typically considered normal:

  • Low AMH: Less than 1.0 ng/mL (7.14 pmol/L)
  • Normal AMH: 1.0 – 4.0 ng/mL (7.14 – 28.56 pmol/L)
  • High AMH: Greater than 4.0 ng/mL (28.56 pmol/L)

These ranges are only a general guideline, and it’s crucial to discuss your specific results with your healthcare provider to gain a thorough understanding of your fertility potential.

 

What is a Good AMH Level by Age?

The table below provides a general overview of good AMH levels by age. Keep in mind that these values are approximate and can vary between individuals.

Age Group Good AMH Level (ng/mL) Good AMH Level (pmol/L)
18 – 24 2.0 – 7.0 14.28 – 50.00
25 – 29 1.5 – 6.5 10.71 – 46.42
30 – 34 1.0 – 5.5 7.14 – 39.28
35 – 39 0.5 – 4.5 3.57 – 32.14
40 – 44 0.2 – 3.5 1.43 – 25.00
45+ 0.0 – 2.5 0.00 – 17.86

 

Factors Affecting AMH Levels:

Several factors can influence AMH levels by age:

  1. Genetics: Genetic predisposition can influence the rate at which a woman’s ovarian reserve declines with age.
  2. Medical history: Certain medical treatments or conditions, such as chemotherapy or autoimmune diseases, can impact AMH levels.
  3. Lifestyle factors: Smoking, obesity, and exposure to environmental toxins can negatively affect AMH levels.

 

What is a Good AMH Level to Get Pregnant?

While there’s no definitive “ideal” AMH level for pregnancy, a good AMH level for pregnancy is generally considered to be within the normal range of 1.0 – 4.0 ng/mL (7.14 – 28.56 pmol/L). Higher AMH levels are typically associated with a larger ovarian reserve, which may increase the likelihood of successful conception.

It’s essential to remember that AMH levels are just one aspect of a woman’s fertility potential. Other factors, such as age, egg quality, and overall health, also play a significant role in the ability to conceive. Consult your healthcare provider to gain a thorough understanding of your fertility potential and any recommended interventions.

Symptoms of Low AMH Levels:

It’s important to understand that low AMH levels do not typically cause noticeable symptoms. AMH is primarily used as an indicator of ovarian reserve and fertility potential. However, some women with low AMH levels may experience symptoms related to underlying conditions, such as premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) or early menopause.

Symptoms Related to Low AMH Levels:

  • Irregular menstrual cycles: Women with low AMH levels may experience irregular periods or skipped cycles.
  • Hot flashes: Sudden feelings of warmth, typically affecting the face, neck, and chest, can occur in women with low AMH levels due to hormonal imbalances.
  • Night sweats: Women may experience excessive sweating during the night as a result of hormonal changes.
  • Vaginal dryness: Reduced estrogen levels can lead to vaginal dryness, causing discomfort during sexual activity.
  • Mood swings: Fluctuating hormone levels can lead to mood swings, irritability, and emotional instability.

Keep in mind that these low AMH symptoms may be associated with other conditions or hormonal imbalances. It’s essential to consult a healthcare provider for a proper evaluation.

 

Causes of Low AMH Levels:

Several factors contribute to low AMH levels, including:

  1. Age: As women age, their ovarian reserve naturally declines, leading to reduced AMH levels. This decline is a normal part of the ageing process and typically begins in the early 30s, with a more rapid decrease after the age of 35.
  1. Genetic Factors: Some women have a genetic predisposition to a reduced ovarian reserve or early menopause, resulting in lower AMH levels. If your mother or sisters experienced early menopause or fertility issues, you may be at a higher risk.
  1. Medical Treatments: Certain medical treatments, such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy, can damage the ovaries and result in lower AMH levels. Additionally, some surgeries involving the ovaries or reproductive system may impact ovarian reserve.
  1. Autoimmune Conditions: Women with autoimmune conditions, such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis, may have a higher risk of developing premature ovarian insufficiency and low AMH levels.
  1. Environmental Factors: Exposure to environmental toxins, such as cigarette smoke or certain chemicals, can negatively impact ovarian reserve and contribute to lower AMH levels.

 

AMH Test Procedure:

The AMH test is a straightforward blood test used to measure the levels of Anti-Mullerian Hormone in a woman’s bloodstream. Here’s what you can expect during the test procedure:

  1. Consultation: Your healthcare provider will discuss your medical history, symptoms, and any concerns you may have about your fertility. They will determine if the AMH test is appropriate for you and explain its significance.
  2. Blood draw: A healthcare professional will draw a small amount of blood from a vein in your arm using a needle. The AMH blood test sample is then sent to a laboratory for analysis.
  3. Results: Your healthcare provider will review the results of your AMH test and discuss them with you. They will explain what your AMH level means in the context of your age, medical history, and any other relevant factors.
  4. Follow-up: Depending on the results of your AMH test, your healthcare provider may recommend additional tests, treatments, or lifestyle changes to optimize your fertility potential. They may also refer you to a fertility specialist if needed.

Treatment for Low AMH Levels:

If you have low AMH levels, your healthcare provider may recommend a variety of low AMH treatment options, depending on your specific situation and goals:

  1. Fertility Treatments: In some cases, fertility treatments, such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intrauterine insemination (IUI), may be recommended to increase the chances of conception. Your healthcare provider may also suggest using donor eggs if your ovarian reserve is severely diminished.
  1. Ovarian Stimulation: For women undergoing IVF, healthcare providers may prescribe higher doses of fertility medications to stimulate the ovaries and promote the development of multiple eggs.
  1. Fertility Preservation: If you’re not ready to conceive but want to preserve your fertility potential, you may consider options such as egg or embryo freezing. These procedures can be beneficial for women with low AMH levels who plan to delay childbearing or undergo medical treatments that may impact fertility.
  2. Alternative Therapies: Some women may explore alternative therapies, such as acupuncture or herbal supplements, to improve fertility. While the effectiveness of these treatments is not well-established, they may provide additional support when combined with conventional therapies.

How to Increase AMH Levels?

While you cannot reverse the natural decline of AMH levels due to ageing, some lifestyle changes may help increase AMH levels and overall fertility potential:

  1. Maintain a healthy weight: Obesity can negatively impact AMH levels and fertility. Focus on maintaining a healthy weight through a balanced diet and regular exercise.
  2. Quit smoking: Smoking has been shown to reduce AMH levels and harm reproductive health. Quitting smoking can improve your fertility potential.
  3. Limit exposure to environmental toxins: Exposure to certain chemicals and environmental pollutants can affect AMH levels. Limit your exposure by using natural cleaning products, avoiding pesticide-laden produce, and reducing the use of plastic containers.
  4. Manage stress: Chronic stress may impact hormonal balance and fertility. Practice stress reduction techniques like yoga, meditation, or deep breathing exercises.
  5. Supplements: Some studies suggest that certain supplements, such as DHEA, Coenzyme Q10, or Vitamin D, may help improve AMH levels.

 

AMH Test Price in India:

The AMH test price in India can vary depending on the laboratory and location. On average, the price ranges from ₹1,000 to ₹3,000 (approximately $13 to $40). It’s essential to check with your local laboratory or healthcare provider for the most accurate pricing information. Some insurance plans may cover the cost of the test, but coverage varies, so it’s crucial to review your policy or speak with your insurance provider.

 

Conclusion:

Understanding what constitutes a good AMH level for pregnancy, as well as available treatment options and ways to improve AMH levels, can help you make informed decisions about your reproductive health. The cost of the AMH test varies depending on location, so it’s essential to research and consult your healthcare provider for the most accurate information.

If you have concerns about your AMH levels or fertility potential, consult your healthcare provider for guidance and support tailored to your unique needs and circumstances. They can recommend appropriate testing, treatments, or lifestyle changes to optimize your fertility potential and help you achieve your family planning goals.

 

F.A.Q

Q: What is a normal AMH level?

A: A normal AMH level varies depending on the individual’s age, gender, and other factors. Generally, a normal AMH level for women of reproductive age is between 0.7 and 3.5 ng/mL. However, it is important to note that AMH levels can vary widely among individuals and should be interpreted in the context of an individual’s clinical situation.

Q: What is AMH level for fertility?

A: AMH level is a marker of ovarian reserve, which is the number and quality of eggs a woman has remaining in her ovaries. A higher AMH level generally indicates better ovarian reserve and therefore greater fertility potential. However, it is important to note that other factors also contribute to fertility, such as age, sperm quality, and overall reproductive health.

Q: What is the best time for AMH test?

A: The best time for an AMH test is on day 3 of a woman’s menstrual cycle, as this is when AMH levels are most stable and reflective of ovarian reserve. However, an AMH test can be performed at any time during the menstrual cycle.

Q: Can I get pregnant with low AMH?

A: Yes, it is possible to get pregnant with low AMH levels. However, lower AMH levels may indicate decreased ovarian reserve and therefore decreased fertility potential. Women with low AMH levels may need to pursue fertility treatments such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) or consider other options such as egg donation or adoption.

Q: How can I increase my AMH naturally?

A: While there is no definitive way to increase AMH levels naturally, there are some lifestyle factors that may help improve overall reproductive health. These include maintaining a healthy body weight, getting regular exercise, managing stress, and avoiding smoking and excessive alcohol consumption.

Q: What is a good AMH level to get pregnant at 35?

A: While AMH levels can vary widely among individuals, a good AMH level for a woman at 35 would be above 1.0 ng/mL. However, it is important to note that age is a significant factor in fertility, and women over the age of 35 may experience decreased fertility potential regardless of their AMH levels.

Q: What is the minimum AMH for IVF?

A: There is no minimum AMH level for IVF. However, women with very low AMH levels may have a lower chance of success with IVF with low AMH and may need to consider other options such as egg donation.

Q: What is a good AMH level for PCOS?

A: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a condition that can cause hormonal imbalances and fertility issues. In women with PCOS, AMH levels are typically elevated due to the presence of multiple small ovarian follicles. A good AMH level for a woman with PCOS would be between 2.5 and 7.0 ng/mL. However, it is important to note that PCOS can have a significant impact on fertility regardless of AMH levels, and women with PCOS may need to pursue fertility treatments to achieve pregnancy.

Q: Does high AMH mean PCOS?

A: A high AMH level can be a sign of PCOS, but it is not definitive. Women with PCOS often have elevated AMH levels due to the presence of multiple small ovarian follicles, but other factors can also influence AMH levels. Additionally, some women with PCOS may have normal or even low AMH levels.

Q: How many eggs left at 35?

A: The number of eggs a woman has at 35 can vary widely, but on average, a 35-year-old woman has about 100,000 to 150,000 eggs remaining in her ovaries. However, it is important to note that egg quality and fertility potential can decrease as a woman ages, regardless of the number of eggs remaining.

Q: What is a bad AMH level?

A: A bad AMH level is one that is significantly below the normal range for a woman’s age group, as this can indicate decreased ovarian reserve and potential fertility issues. However, what constitutes a “bad” AMH level can vary depending on an individual’s clinical situation and other factors.

Q: What are normal AMH levels by age?

A: Normal AMH levels can vary depending on age, as ovarian reserve and fertility potential decline with age. Generally, a normal AMH level for women of reproductive age is between 0.7 and 3.5 ng/mL. However, AMH levels typically decline with age, and a level of 0.3 ng/mL or lower may be considered low for women over the age of 40.

Q: What are the symptoms of low AMH?

A: Low AMH levels typically do not cause any symptoms on their own, but they may be an indicator of decreased ovarian reserve and potential fertility issues. Women with low AMH levels may experience irregular periods, difficulty conceiving, or early menopause.

Q: Does AMH indicate egg quality?

A: While AMH levels are a marker of ovarian reserve, they do not directly indicate egg quality. Egg quality is determined by a number of factors, including age, genetics, and lifestyle factors.

Q: What is normal AMH levels by age female?

A: Normal AMH levels can vary depending on age and other factors. Generally, a normal AMH level for women of reproductive age is between 0.7 and 3.5 ng/mL. However, AMH levels typically decline with age, and a level of 0.3 ng/mL or lower may be considered low for women over the age of 40.

Q: What is a good AMH level for PCOS?

A: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a condition that can cause hormonal imbalances and fertility issues. In women with PCOS, AMH levels are typically elevated due to the presence of multiple small ovarian follicles. A good AMH level for a woman with PCOS would be between 2.5 and 7.0 ng/mL. However, it is important to note that PCOS can have a significant impact on fertility regardless of AMH levels, and women with PCOS may need to pursue fertility treatments to achieve pregnancy.

Q: What is AMH value in PCOS?

A: In women with PCOS, AMH levels are typically elevated due to the presence of multiple small ovarian follicles. AMH levels in women with PCOS can vary widely, but levels above 3.5 ng/mL are common.

Q: Is an AMH of 4.5 good?

A: An AMH level of 4.5 ng/mL is considered a good level for women of reproductive age. However, it is important to note that AMH levels can vary widely among individuals and should be interpreted in the context of an individual’s clinical situation. Other factors, such as age and overall reproductive health, also play a role in fertility potential.

Book Your Appointment

    Dr Mona Dahiya

    Dr Mona Dahiya

    IVF Specialist & Consultant

    Dr Mona Dahiya has performed over 5,000+ IVF cycles and is considered a global expert in IVF, ICSI, IUI and male fertility treatment. She is an eminent writer on Infertility Treatment and has over 100 Publications in both International and National Journals. Dr Mona Dahiya has immensely contributed to the field of infertility through her Research and articles.

    Recent Posts

    Best Fertility Specialist in India

    Best Fertility Specialist in India  WITH 85% SUCCESS RATE Dr. Mona Dahiya is considered one of the best fertility specialists in India for several reasons. These include her extensive experience of 25 Years, high success rates of 85% and a comprehensive approach to...

    Choosing The Right Clinic For High Ivf Success Rates In India

    CHOOSING THE RIGHT CLINIC FOR HIGH IVF SUCCESS RATES IN INDIA Choosing the right IVF clinic in India involves considering several key factors to ensure you have a high chance of success and a supportive treatment experience: Clinic’s Reputation: Opt for clinics with a...

    Best Infertility Doctors in India

    BEST INFERTILITY SPECIALIST IN INDIA The Best infertility specialists in India are globally popular for their expertise, comprehensive training and worldwide global experience. These infertility Doctors in India have had a profound impact on fertility research. The...

    Complete Guide to ICSI IVF

    What is ICSI Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection? For individuals facing infertility, ICSI is a specialized form of IVF that significantly increases pregnancy chances, especially with male infertility concerns. ICSI procedure involves directly injecting a single sperm...

    INTRODUCTION PCOS & FEMALE INFERTILITY

    Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is a common yet often misunderstood condition, affecting approximately 1 in 10 women of reproductive age worldwide. Characterized by a combination of symptoms that can include irregular menstrual cycles, excess androgen levels, and...

    CUTTING EDGE FERTILITY TREATMENTS

    FOREWORD | CUTTING EDGE FERTILITY TREATMENTS Infertility has emerged as a significant global health issue which is known to affect approximately 10-15% of couples worldwide. In the past decade, India has become a premier destination for fertility treatments for...

    Female Infertility Causes and Treatment

    Little Angel IVF: Unveiling the Mysteries of Female Infertility - Causes and Treatment Insights Female Infertility Causes and Treatment here - Embarking on the journey of parenthood can be challenging, especially when faced with the complexities of female infertility....

    Affordable IVF Cost in India for Families

    IVF, while intricate and costly is more affordable in India compared to Western countries, making it a popular destination for medical tourism. The cost of IVF in India varies based on factors like age, fertility issues, medical history and the number of cycles...

    HSG Tests in Noida

    HSG TESTS IN NOIDA Hysterosalpingography (HSG) is a vital diagnostic tool in the realm of female fertility evaluation. Little Angel IVF stands as a recognized name for conducting HSG tests in Noida with precision and care. An HSG test is a specialized X-ray procedure...

    Who is the best doctor for Infertility Treatment in India

    WHICH DOCTOR IS BEST FOR INFERTILITY TREATMENT IN INDIA Dr. Mona Dahiya is a renowned and highly respected medical professional specializing in the field of infertility treatment. With her vast knowledge, expertise, and compassionate approach, Dr. Dahiya has gained...